Baroque

Baroque I

An important element in interior decoration in the 18th century consisted of new types of furniture: the chest of drawers and its derivations. The chest of drawers made in Lombardy at the end of the 17th century has the characteristic broken front with inlaid decorative motifs of semi-reclining figures with ivory details.

The chest of drawers combined with writing desk on show with its buoyant undulating contour line and inlaid borders with diamond motifs was done in Veneto at the end of the 17th or beginning of the 18th century.

The tallboy is an item characteristic of English and American workmanship. On the back of the tallboy the date is noted in large brass rivets: ME 1729.

A new type of furniture is the bureau cabinet, so-called tabernacle, widely found in 18th century southern Germany and in particular in Austria, which explains its frequent presence in inland Croatia. The specimen on show has an aristocratic coat of arms inlaid in the little doors of the niche; it belongs to the Škrlec or Skerlecz family of Turopolje, and is combined with the initials SSDL for Sigismund Skerlecz de Lomnicza, president of the high court and legal representative of the bishop of Zagreb as well as prefect of the noble commune of Turopolje. The marking for the year, 1713, was done at a later time.

New types of clock, among which the floor clock and tabernacle clock stand out, became in the 17th century an essential item of aristocratic and bourgeois interiors. A fine example is the longcase clock of the famed London clockmaker Daniel Quare.

Although in northern Croatia in the 17th century the goldsmiths and silversmiths were combined in guilds that, as in other countries, carried out checks on the material and the hallmarking, relatively few products made have been preserved. The silver work of this period then shows items of German and Italian origin. The displayed box of Johan Lucas Sigel of 1705, the wine taster, a grape-like goblet and jug from the Zagreb St Catherine’s of the 18th century have all the features of German Baroque design; the techniques in their making are embossing and chasing of silver sheet metal. A grand cross of mountain crystal with silver gilt fittings comes from the bequest of Bishop Franjo Gašparić.

The items of glassware shown here, mainly deriving from Bohemia and Germany, show the forms and decorative modes characteristic of the period. New kinds of hard lead glass enabled the application of new techniques of decoration. Engraving, cutting and grinding suited the Baroque taste, which preferred rather strong heavy forms and opulent decoration of the whole surface of the object. Prague became a glassmaking centre, the leading glass cutter being Kaspar Lehmann, master craftsman at the court of Rudolph II. Lehmann’s pupil George Schwanchardt is held to be the founder of the famed cut glass making tradition in another important glassmaking centre, Nuremberg, where around 1660 the painting technique known as Schwarzlotmalerei developed.

Valuable specimens of Dutch faience on show in this room were shaped on the model of Chinese porcelain. Since porcelain was not produced in Europe at this time, faience was used in the making of crockery that in form and painted decorations imitated the precious ware of the Orient. These products were brought to Europe in fact by the Dutch East India Company which traded not only in china but also in spices, fabrics and exotic woods.

 

Baroque II

An important element in interior decoration in the 18th century consisted of new types of furniture: the chest of drawers and its derivations. The chest of drawers made in Lombardy at the end of the 17th century has the characteristic broken front with inlaid decorative motifs of semi-reclining figures with ivory details.

The chest of drawers combined with writing desk on show with its buoyant undulating contour line and inlaid borders with diamond motifs was done in Veneto at the end of the 17th or beginning of the 18th century.

The tallboy is an item characteristic of English and American workmanship. On the back of the tallboy the date is noted in large brass rivets: ME 1729.

A new type of furniture is the bureau cabinet, so-called tabernacle, widely found in 18th century southern Germany and in particular in Austria, which explains its frequent presence in inland Croatia. The specimen on show has an aristocratic coat of arms inlaid in the little doors of the niche; it belongs to the Škrlec or Skerlecz family of Turopolje, and is combined with the initials SSDL for Sigismund Skerlecz de Lomnicza, president of the high court and legal representative of the bishop of Zagreb as well as prefect of the noble commune of Turopolje. The marking for the year, 1713, was done at a later time.

New types of clock, among which the floor clock and tabernacle clock stand out, became in the 17th century an essential item of aristocratic and bourgeois interiors. A fine example is the longcase clock of the famed London clockmaker Daniel Quare.

Although in northern Croatia in the 17th century the goldsmiths and silversmiths were combined in guilds that, as in other countries, carried out checks on the material and the hallmarking, relatively few products made have been preserved. The silver work of this period then shows items of German and Italian origin. The displayed box of Johan Lucas Sigel of 1705, the wine taster, a grape-like goblet and jug from the Zagreb St Catherine’s of the 18th century have all the features of German Baroque design; the techniques in their making are embossing and chasing of silver sheet metal. A grand cross of mountain crystal with silver gilt fittings comes from the bequest of Bishop Franjo Gašparić.

The items of glassware shown here, mainly deriving from Bohemia and Germany, show the forms and decorative modes characteristic of the period. New kinds of hard lead glass enabled the application of new techniques of decoration. Engraving, cutting and grinding suited the Baroque taste, which preferred rather strong heavy forms and opulent decoration of the whole surface of the object. Prague became a glassmaking centre, the leading glass cutter being Kaspar Lehmann, master craftsman at the court of Rudolph II. Lehmann’s pupil George Schwanchardt is held to be the founder of the famed cut glass making tradition in another important glassmaking centre, Nuremberg, where around 1660 the painting technique known as Schwarzlotmalerei developed.

Valuable specimens of Dutch faience on show in this room were shaped on the model of Chinese porcelain. Since porcelain was not produced in Europe at this time, faience was used in the making of crockery that in form and painted decorations imitated the precious ware of the Orient. These products were brought to Europe in fact by the Dutch East India Company which traded not only in china but also in spices, fabrics and exotic woods.